Ballot Measures 2022


Oregon Measure 111 is known as the Right to Healthcare Amendment.
Click here for the text of Measure 111.

Measure 111 would amend the state constitution to require the state to “ensure that every resident of Oregon has access to cost-effective, clinically appropriate and affordable health care as a fundamental right”.

Measure 111 would also require the state to balance the obligation of ensuring a right to healthcare against funding public schools and other essential public services. The amendment states that legal remedies for lawsuits brought against the proposed section may not interfere with the balance between a right to healthcare and funding other essential public services.

Measure 111 was approved and referred by the legislature.

A “yes” vote means that you support amending the state constitution to require that the state “ensure that every resident of Oregon has access to cost-effective, clinically appropriate and affordable health care as a fundamental right.”

Measure 111 would be a first in the nation right. Rep. Andrea Salinas, (D), who voted in support of the measure in the legislature and is now running for U.S. Congress in Congressional District 6, said, "We need to send this to the voters because of the unpredictability of the future of health care at the federal level. The marketplace needs some stability, and the state of Oregon needs a path forward. We don’t need better insurance instruments, we need better access to health care."

Oregon Measure 112 would amend the Oregon Constitution to ban the use of
slavery and involuntary servitude as punishment for a crime.
Click here for the text of Measure 112.

Measure 112 would also authorize Oregon courts and probation or parole agencies to order alternatives to incarceration for a convicted individual as part of sentencing.

Measure 112 was approved and referred by the legislature.

A yes vote on Measure 112 means you agree to amend the constitution to ban use of slavery and involuntary servitude as punishment for a crime. A yes vote also means you agree to authorize Oregon courts and probation or parole agencies to order alternatives to incarceration for a convicted individual as part of sentencing.

As of January 2021, Oregon was one of 10 states that had a provision prohibiting enslavement and involuntary servitude but with an exception for criminal punishments. Recently, Nebraska, Utah, and Colorado voters all voted to change their state constitutions and ban slavery and involuntary servitude as punishment for crimes.

Oregonians Against Slavery Involuntary Servitude (OASIS) is leading the campaign in support of Measure 112. OASIS said, “[The amendment] would remove the exception of slavery and involuntary servitude from the Oregon State Constitution and brings us one step closer to a more just and equitable state and world. By changing this language, Oregon would do away with the antiquated racist legacy of slavery in our State's most important document.”


Measure 113 is known as the Exclusion from Re-election for Legislative Absenteeism Initiative.
Click here for the text of Measure 113.


Measure 113 would disqualify Oregon state legislators from re-election if they are absent from 10 legislative floor sessions without permission or excuse.

A yes vote means that you agree legislators should not qualify for re-election if they are absent from 10 legislative floor sessions without permission or excuse.

Measure 113 was initiated by voters. Hold Politicians Accountable is leading the effort to pass Measure 113. Its many supporters say it’s time to hold politicians accountable for failing to show up to do the job they were elected to do.


Measure 114 is called the Changes to Firearm Ownership and Purchase Requirements Initiative.
Click here for the text of Measure 114.

Measure 114 would

  • require permits issued by local law enforcement to buy a firearm;

  • require photo ID, fingerprints, safety training, criminal background check, and fee payment to apply for a permit; and

  • criminalize the manufacture, importation, possession, use, purchase, sale, or transfer of ammunition magazines capable of holding more than 10 rounds.


A yes vote on Measure 114 means you agree everyone who buys a gun must obtain a permit issued by local law enforcement and that before issuing a permit, local law enforcement must require photo ID, fingerprints, safety training, criminal background check, and fee payment. In voting yes on Measure 114, you would also agree that the manufacture, importation, possession, use, purchase, sale, or transfer of ammunition magazines capable of holding more than 10 rounds will be criminalized.


Measure 114 was initiated by voters. The League of Women Voters of Oregon and Oregon Alliance for Gun Safety are supporters. Rev. Mark Knutson, chief petitioner and pastor at Augustana Lutheran Church in Portland: "I hope it shows how residents in a state can come together from many directions and address the public health crisis of gun violence with common sense and well-put-together legislation. I hope that people are inspired to say: We can do this."